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We would love your feedback - re Adoption Contracts. We are currently going through the throes of rewriting ours to be more simple english and less restrictive. Why? Liability insurance this year was a challenge - Insurers feedback via our broker is due to the additional risk from the perceived liability for horses rehomed but 'remaining' in some form of ownership of the charity they will not consider 'Horse Rescues'. Horses and ponies live very long mostly happy lives - many outlive their owners but also they are surviving beyond the lifespan of the 'rescue' - just this week we have been asked to accept horses from a now non-existent horse rescue. Our beautiful HSES Norman and HSES Cherish previously both came from a closing horse rescue. Restrictive contracts may prevent talented horses and ponies attracting competitive homes where the training adds significant value to the horse. This is perhaps more controversial however - we would love a $ for everytime we hear "but rescue horses have problems"! Yes some do - and these generally stay here at the Sanctuary. We need to see more horses and ponies out and about showing just how great they are regardless of previous misfortunes. This does also put the onus firmly on us here at HSES to ensure we do the best in matching the right home for each horse. Often easier said than done! However - this could mean horses change homes or riders. Our current viewpoint is the one thing we must do is to continue providing every horse a 'Right to Return home to the Sanctuary'. That means we must continue to build, reshape and ensure we remain sustainable into the future. We chose this picture of HSES Mia and HSES Slinky - as food for thought - imagine if dogs could live as long as horses. ... See MoreSee Less
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Yesterday we found our beautiful old mare HSES Cherish had passed away overnight. We can imagine her in heaven now bossing her old soul mate HSES Norman. We had her bloods done in January and it revealed that although the total number of white blood cells (WBC) is normal, the type of WBC that attack Bacteria (Neutrophils) are a little low. This coupled with the lower end platelet count may mean that there is a slow decrease in bone marrow activity. The amount of Red Blood Cells (RBC) being made is normal. As we are now on a regular blood monitoring program, the vet guidance was to just keep an eye on this into the future. We are awaiting the most recent analysis - however she had started to show signs of her age eating well but slowing down significantly - we believe HSES Cherish to be in her early 30's. Miss you old girl until we meet again. ... See MoreSee Less
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This morning HSES Bones had a very special friend hitching a ride ... See MoreSee Less
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HSES Cherish and HSES Miss Daisy - rugs off and into the stables to wait to see if they can join the Cushings study! They were very well behaved 30+ year olds. ... See MoreSee Less
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As excited as they were to be on the move - they are moving up to a paddock close to the Rehab centre as tomorrow some of the little guys are participating in a Melbourne University Vet study on Cushings and Laminitis. HSES Lincoln loves his little friends - so will be superviser in charge!It is estimated that around 1 in 5 older ponies and horses may get Cushing’s disease (PPID). Dr. Nick Bamford, is currently running a project to understand why ponies with this condition may be more at risk of getting laminitis. As well as investigating whether the standard treatment for Cushings (Prascend) can reduce the main risk factor for laminitis (high insulin levels). Hopefully by identifying these at-risk ponies sooner, more ponies can be prevented from getting laminitis. We are thrilled to be able to take part - many of these little guys have suffered laminitis in their past and/or Cushings and we know how incredibly painful and life threatening it is! ... See MoreSee Less
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